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Topic: Tubulars vs Clinchers

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Tubulars or Clinchers, which do you prefer? [4 vote(s)]

Tubulars
50.0%
Clinchers
50.0%
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Tubulars vs Clinchers

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The tire that most of us are familiar with is the clincher which consists of an inner tube and a tire. It won't go into how that works because that's pretty sure everyone understands this. The tubular, or sew up, is glued/ taped directly to a rim that is specifically for tubular tires. The tube is sewn up inside the tire making it a single piece system. You can get to the tube if necessary but it is time consuming and many simply discard it and replace the whole tubular.

 

Note that the wheels and tires for clinchers and tubulars are not interchangeable.

 

Most of the guys who read this have changed a clincher tire. Even if it was on a BMX. Nothing has changed. If you did it then, you can do it now. Some local bike shops often offer flat tire clinics to show tips for a fast change. If you are worried about speed, you can practice over and over and get fast.

 

You can always find a clincher tire where ever you are and have several choices. Not so with tubulars. Most shops only carry a couple choices. In some small towns you might be out of luck all together. Same with tubular replacement rims. There are far more choices for clincher wheels and tires. Tubular wheel/tire combos are lighter, but if you're not climbing huge mountains. Weight should not be your number one concern. 

 

Those who prefer tubulars often note that the tires have lower rolling resistance due to a higher inflation limit. They often have a higher tread count and can wear extremely well and ride better than a standard clincher. Some claim it's faster and easier to change a tubular than a clincher and you get fewer flats because you don't get pinch flats. These could all be great reasons for choosing tubulars.

 

While a tubular might be easier and faster to mount on a rim, there's a couple small problems. First is that the tough part of changing a tubular is getting it off of the rim. Because tubulars might not flat as often, and you might only use the wheel set with the tubulars for racing, there's a good chance that when you do flat, it'll be during a race.

 

Now, cast your vote! Let us know which you prefer!



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Experience Vintage... Love Vintage...

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As for me I prefer clincher..I agree with demon tubular rides fast and smooth ..

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Love the look of steel..

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Tubulars are $$$, Cement glue messy affair, requires tactics and skills to replace and the drying time is too long of a wait.

However, you trade all of these for speed and lightness... So if you are a pro rider or an L'Eroica rider, you will use them without regrets.

Clinichers were invented after tubulars i suppose? 



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